How Do You Choose a Whiskey Glass?


Whiskey drinkers know that the proper whiskey glass is crucial to their enjoyment of whiskey the way they want to experience it. Many different components make up the drinking experience of whiskey, which will contribute to your choice of a whiskey glass. There are various sizes and shapes, but also different materials used and price points. We’ll help you consider all these factors before you choose the perfect whiskey glass for you.

How to Choose a Whiskey Glass Based on Shape and Size

whiskey-glass-types

If you’ve ever looked into buying wine glasses, you know that the size and shape of the bowl of the glass plays a role in the aromatic and sensory experience of drinking wine. The same is true for whiskey glasses.

The bowl shape and size play a big part of enhancing the spirit’s aroma and taste experience. For one, when the bowl is larger, swirling techniques can be used to aerate the whiskey and release the oaky aromas. Not only that, it helps eliminate the smell of alcohol that can be pretty strong if not helped by the size and shape of the larger bowl.

While the larger bowl allows for aeration and swirling techniques to be utilized, it should not be as large as a wine glass. Therefore, when selecting a whiskey glass, choose a large glass to allow the whiskey to breathe, but not as large as a wine glass.

glencairn-glass-and-pourer (2)Glencairn Whiskey Glasses

You may be wondering then what whiskey glass is the right size and shape. One excellent option is the Glencairn glass. This is an ideal drinking glass because its size for the perfect aeration of whiskey.

The Glencairn has a large bowl ideal for swirling and a wide opening that makes drinking easy. This makes the Glencairn a practical and effective drinking glass for single malt and scotch whisky. This glass is also one to pick if you are someone who enjoys the taste of your whiskey. This makes sense because the Glencairn glass is often used in whiskey tastings because of its ability to swirl the whiskey while being easy to sip and slowly drink.

 

bowmore-glencairn-whiskey-glassNeat Whiskey Glasses

The neat glass is one of the coolest shaped glasses out there. If you are someone who would prefer to avoiding nosing the ethanol scent of the whiskey, the neat glass might be the glass for you. This fishbowl-looking glass is designed to remove the harsh ethanol vapors from the whiskey and leaves behind the tasteful scents of whiskey without the ethanol.

 

How to Choose a Universal Whiskey Glass

Another important consideration in choosing a whiskey glass is the versatility of the glass. If you are looking for a more versatile option that can be used for multiple occasions and hold whiskey in all of its forms, the old-fashioned glass is a great option.

 

smoked-whiskey-old-fashioned-glassOld Fashioned Whisky Glasses

The old-fashioned glass, also known as the whiskey tumbler, lowball, or on the rocks glass, is a short glass with a sturdy, wide-bottomed, thick base that can hold whiskey neat or on the rocks, and is also perfect for whiskey cocktails. Because you can make just about any whiskey drink in this, it is a great versatile option for those who want to buy just one type of whiskey glass.

When contemplating the use of a more versatile whiskey glass, consider how you most commonly drink your whiskey. This is to say that if you are someone who likes to have more non-alcoholic mixers with your whiskey, the old-fashioned might not cut it for you.

 

highball-whiskey-glassHighball Whiskey Glasses

In this case, you may want to invest in a highball glass that is a taller version of the whiskey tumbler with plenty of room for more liquid.  On the other hand, if you like to keep it simple by drinking your whiskey neat, with ice, or smaller cocktails, then an old-fashioned glass would be just fine. There are plenty of types of glasses to discover in our blog post What is a Whiskey Glass Called?.

 

How to Choose a Whiskey Glass Based on Cost

Consider how much you want to spend on a set of whiskey glasses. High-end, handblown crystal whiskey glasses are the most expensive on the market, while molded glass would be the cheaper option. Crystal has smooth edges, which allows for etching intricate patterns onto the glass. Crystal is also more brilliant than glass and creates a distinct shine.

 

whiskey-glass-slamHow to Choose a Durable Whiskey Glass

As mentioned above, delicate options such as crystal are more expensive. But durability is something to consider as you will be spending money on something you hope will last you a while. The tempering of the glass determines its durability. Tempered glass goes through a process of quickly heating and cooling down the glass to enhance its strength. So if you want a durable whiskey glass, choose one that is tempered.

In addition to all these factors, you’ll also want to check if the whiskey glasses you are choosing are dishwasher safe and how they are recommended to be stored. For example, can they be stacked in a cupboard, or do they need to be left apart, taking up more space? These are all considerations that will help you choose the right whiskey glasses for you.

 

Finally, you want to pick a whiskey glass that is appealing in its appearance. Glass.com offers a pristine collection of good-looking whiskey glasses for your convenience that considers all of these factors.

 

 

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By Isabella Taffera

Isabella Taffera is an author for Glass.com


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