What is a Whiskey Glass Called?


Just as with wine, a whiskey glass is meant to enhance your drinking experience. There is no single whiskey glass eiter, but rather a whiskey glass for nearly every purpose.  

What is a whiskey glass called? With so many different styles of whiskey glasses, there’s not just one whiskey glass name. The names range from a shot glass to a Glencairn glass to some others in between. What determines what a whisky glass is called depends on what the glass looks like and its purpose.

What are short, round whiskey glasses called?

whiskey-pour-tumbler-glassOld Fashioned Glass
Lowball Glass
Rocks Glass
Whiskey Tumbler

The most common and well-known whiskey glass is called the old-fashioned glass. Another name for this whiskey glass is the lowball glass, the rocks glass, or the whiskey tumbler. These all refer to the classic short, wide brim, and thick base glass often used to serve whiskey. There are many features of this glass that make it ideal for serving whiskey.

  1. It is the perfect glass for serving whiskey neat or on the rocks because the wide brim makes serving easy.
  2. The wide and thick base makes it great for muddling non-liquid ingredients for cocktails before adding the whiskey.
  3. It is a versatile glass that can also serve whiskey cocktails because the wide brim makes mixing easy.

What are tall, slender whiskey glasses called?

highball-whiskey-glassThe Highball Glass

The highball glass is similar to the old-fashioned glass, but it is a taller version. This glass features a thick base at the bottom of the glass for increased stability and prevention of spills. It  is ideal for serving mixed cocktails with whiskey because it can hold much more liquid. This glass has room for ice, non-alcoholic mixer, and whiskey all in one tall glass. A favorite cocktail to drink in the highball glass is the aptly-named Highball cocktail featuring whiskey and soda water.

 

bowmore-glencairn-whiskey-glass

What are whiskey judging glasses called?

The NEAT Glass

NEAT stands for Naturally Engineered Aroma Technology. This glass is designed to keep the harsh scent of ethanol away from the drinker’s nose. This glass looks like no other glass you’ve seen and that’s because it’s creation was a happy accident. The NEAT glass was created by a glass blowing factory mishap. But now, this glass is a whiskey-drinking staple glass. Most people who drink in a NEAT glass are using it to appreciate their whiskey more. It is known as the official competition judging glass. Still, it is also a good glass for new drinkers because it helps to remove the harsh smell of alcohol. 

 

What are whiskey tasting glasses called?

Nosing Glass
Snifter Glass
Glencairn Glass
Tulip Glass
Copita Glass

Whiskey glasses most often found at whiskey tastings are called nosing glasses. This is the all-encompassing term used to describe whiskey glasses that are specifically designed for tasting. As the name implies, nosing glasses help the drinker to smell the aromas of the whiskey.

glencairn-glass-and-pourer

The Glencairn glass is often found in upscale restaurants and whiskey tastings. You can identify a Glencairn glass by the short, solid base and thicker glass. The bowl shape of the glass makes it great for swirling the whiskey to release the aromas. It is often used for drinking single malt whiskey.

 

 

glencairn-whiskey-glass-pourThe snifter glass is somewhat similar to the Glencairn glass as it is a short, stemmed glass with a narrow opening that is also used for whiskey tastings. However, it lacks the short, thick base featured on a Glencairn glass. Instead, a snifter of whiskey sits directly on the table. The snifter glass is used in tastings because this is a glass used for sipping on whiskey for people who like to savor the taste of the whiskey. The snifter glass is more commonly used to serve Brandy.

 

tall-tulip-whiskey-glassThe tulip whiskey glass, also called the copita glass, is another excellent choice for those who like to appreciate their whiskey. A tulip shaped glass features a long stem with a bowl shape that narrows at the top. The glass can be held to warm the whiskey, and it can also concentrate the aromas within the glass. This glass is ideal for nosing whiskey to appreciate the smells it presents.

 

What are short, small whiskey glasses called?

classy-whiskey-shot-glassShot Glasses

Here’s one we all know—the shot glass. Shot glasses are short glasses that are meant to serve small amounts ( single shot, or 1.5 fluid ounces) of whiskey at a time. A shot glass is not for someone looking to sip their whiskey but rather to quickly consume a small amount of whiskey.

Shot glass variations allow for some creativity in drinking whiskey in a shot glass. For example, the shooter glass is slightly taller than the standard shot glass, which leaves room to add different ingredients to the shot of whiskey to create a sort of mini cocktail.

What glass should you drink whisky from?

As you can see, there are lots of different names for whisky glasses. What kind of glass you drink whiskey from depends on how you intend to drink your whiskey. No matter which you choose to use, Glass.com has a selection of high-quality options for you and your favorite whiskey cocktails.

The next time you enjoy a glass of whiskey, will you be enjoying it from a proper whiskey glass? Tell us in the comments below what kind of glass you drink whiskey from.

 

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By Isabella Taffera

Isabella Taffera is an author for Glass.com


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