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Motorhome and RV Windshield Replacement

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For as long as you can remember, you’ve dreamed of spending retirement on the open road behind the wheel of your very own RV. And now, those days are here! Nothing could be finer … until a rock or some other form of debris lands itself in the middle of your windshield—leaving unsightly damage. What do you do? Here’s what you need to know about getting the damage fixed so you can get back on the road.

Cost in Numbers

While replacing the windshield in a car may be a fairly routine chore, RV windshields are different. To start, the typical cost of an RV or motorhome windshield replacement is significantly more than replacing a car windshield. This is partly because of supply and demand—many cars are manufactured every year, but only a limited numbers of RVs are produced. Therefore, a smaller number of replacement glass parts are made and the cost is higher to produce them.

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Big Business

There’s also the massive size of the windshield to keep in mind. In fact, many RV windshields are actually two pieces side by side rather than one long span of glass. According to the RVing Guide website the cost to replace half a windshield usually starts at more than $500. The price can quickly increase depending on availability for the specific RV. Once labor is factored in, you could pay at least $1,000—if not much more.

Is RV Windshield Repair an Option?

Your best bet, if facing a small chip or crack, is to have it repaired as quickly as possible. This typically comes at a much more budget-friendly price point. You may still see the damage, but the repair may likely help keep the damage from spreading. Depending on the state in which you live and the type of policy you have, your repair or replacement may be covered by insurance. Your insurance company may also have rules about what’s covered as well. You’ll want to consult your policy to find out for sure.

Hit the Road

Now that you have an idea of what’s involved with RV windshields, be sure and check out the other blogs and resources on glass.com for more pointers and tips when it comes to your automotive glass questions and needs.

Please note, this article may contain links to Amazon products. As an Amazon Associate, Glass.com earns from qualifying purchases.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ellen Rogers

Ellen Rogers has been involved with the glass industry for nearly 20 years and is the editor of USGlass Magazine and Architects’ Guide to Glass magazine. Ellen received a degree from Peace College where she studied journalism.

Ellen enjoys running and competes regularly in races including half and full marathons. When not on the go, Ellen enjoys reading, wine tasting, true crime shows, and family game nights with her husband and son. Their favorite game is Clue. Ellen also bakes what is known locally as “World Famous Oatmeal Cookies.”

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